Archive for the Public Health Category

SNAP Decisions: When Your Local Government-Approved Retailer Is Dennies Liquors

Mar 02

Growing up in a family that relied on government assistance to help us meet our food and nutrition needs, my biggest concern was avoiding the embarrassment that came with pulling out the booklet of paper food stamps in our upper-middle class neighborhood grocery store. As a kid, that embarrassment felt bigger than all the things […]

Wanted: Blood, Urine, and a Soil Sample from Your Yard

Oct 03

What would it take to get you to participate in a government study in which you and 999,999 other people committed to providing personal health data and blood and urine samples for at least 10 years? This summer, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced $55 million in awards to build the foundation and infrastructure […]

How the World Wins When Presidents Survive Disease

Sep 15

As Barack Obama’s presidency comes to an end, there’s a lot of discussion about legacy and predictions about how he’ll be remembered. It has me thinking about how we remember the other men who have held that high office. Those who are considered our top presidents have profound epitaphs, but their contributions to public health […]

Lesson on Infographics from John Snow (no, not that Jon Snow)

Jan 12

Data visualization. Information architecture. Infographic. These are buzz words in the modern communications environment where the ability to show processes, statistics, and messages in a visually pleasing way has become communications gold. The growth of communications platforms like Facebook and Twitter has driven the value of graphic content, including infographics, which can be shared with […]

You Are What You Tweet

Aug 13

‘Slice of life’ tweets have been some of the most scorned content on the Internet. Who really cares if you’re frying up grass-fed bacon by the pound or binge watching the latest season of House of Cards from your couch? Most of us consider this the custard-like filling of the Twittersphere—lots of calories, little substance. […]

Walking the Fine Line – Fear and Health Communications

Jun 05

I had the opportunity to recently attend the Health Conference at 1776’s Challenge Festival. The first part of my day was spent immersed in panel discussions that featured thought leaders whose end goal is to create a healthier world. The second part of my day was spent sitting on the edge of my seat while […]

What’s In A Name?

Apr 02

My last post about Ogilvy’s rebranding of our “social marketing practice” to Social Change generated quite a bit of buzz in the social marketing community over the past few days – particularly on the social marketing listserv (SOC-MKTG@georgetown.edu). Knowing that this topic has been a source of much debate within the community for many years, […]

(Re) Introducing Social Change

Mar 27

For many years, Ogilvy Public Relations has used the term “social marketing practice” to refer to our team of experts in human behavior who are dedicated to helping people live healthier, safer, more secure, and happier lives. Now, we are Ogilvy Social Change. Why? In all honestly, it’s partly because I became exhausted by the […]

White and Gold or Black and Blue…Should That Really Be The Question?

Mar 18

For the better part of the last weekend in February, my parents (in their seventies) visiting from Brooklyn, my eleven year old daughter, my seven year old son, my nineteen year old au pair from Denmark, and various friends and family as far flung as France and as close in as a few blocks from […]

Does Prevention Have an Expiration Date?

Jan 28

I just read Jason Karlawish’s article Too Young to Die, Too Old to Worry.   Karlawish uses singer Leonard Cohen as a way to tee up a very compelling question: “When should we set aside a life lived for the future and, instead, embrace the pleasures of the present?”  Cohen celebrated his 80th birthday this past […]