How alike and different are Caucasians, African Americans and Hispanics when it comes to supporting causes?

May 31

How alike and different are Caucasians, African Americans and Hispanics when it comes to supporting causes?

Our latest release on the study Dynamics of Cause Engagement revealed interesting similarities and differences in how people of different ethnicities engage with causes.

Among the most interesting findings is the fact that social media play a greater role in cause engagement for African Americans and Hispanics than for Caucasians.

Specifically, African Americans and Hispanics are more likely than Caucasians to believe that social networking sites help get the word out about a social issue or cause and help increase visibility for causes.  (We reported a similar finding among women in our last release.)  Nearly one in three African American adults and four in ten Hispanics say they are more likely to support a cause or social issue online than offline today—both significantly higher percentages than reported by Caucasians.  

 

However, it is important to notice that, across ethnicities, the historically prominent types of engagement (e.g., donating, signing petitions, volunteering) remain among the top ways Americans get involved with causes. Likewise, traditional channels of communication (e.g., television & print media, personal relationship, and websites) remain the top ways that Americans learn about causes.

Another interesting finding: the belief that supporting causes makes people feel good about themselves and creates a sense of purpose and meaning in life is shared across different ethnicities. Nevertheless, African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to value familial cause engagement. They believe that it’s important that their families are involved with causes and said that they were actively involved in causes when growing up.  Additionally, nearly 7 in 10 African Americans and Hispanics affirm that supporting causes gives them the feeling of belonging to a community—this figure was significantly lower among Caucasians.

 

Interested in learning more about how the different ethnicities engage with causes? Click here and download the full release.

Stay tuned for our next release on cause involvement by generation on June 13.

 

This entry was posted on Tuesday, May 31st, 2011 at 7:01 pm and is filed under Corporate Social Responsibility, Media, Ogilvy Washington, Social Marketing, Social Media. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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