Survey Recognizes Social Marketing as Critical Tool in Driving Social Change

Aug 17

Findings were released yesterday from a survey conducted by Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, in collaboration with The Conference People, prior to the 2nd World Non-Profit and Social Marketing Conference. The survey was conducted to examine trends and issues of social marketing, as well as priorities for the future.

More than 600 marketers, communications experts, and researchers from 40 countries convened at the Conference in Dublin, Ireland, on April 11-12, 2011. The survey, conducted among Conference participants and invitees—including representatives of leading corporations, civic organizations, academic institutions, governmental entities, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)—found that 84% of respondents report that they believe that social marketing is at a critical turning point in driving social change.

The key findings showcase that the application of marketing and communications to support personal behavior and social change is poised to become an increasingly important tool for addressing global health and social issues.

Here are some highlights:

When asked to identify the areas in which social marketing has most advanced societal progress, respondents named:

Looking ahead, respondents identified areas in which they felt that social marketing was most needed to drive future awareness and behavior change. Obesity, chronic illness, and environmental stewardship top the list of emerging priorities.

Read the full report or press release

Additional posts about the conference include:

A recap of the 2nd World-Non-Profit and Social Marketing Conference

From WSMC: What is Social Marketing

The 4Ps of Social Marketing: Are They Still Relevant

Five Steps to Environmentally Sustainable Behavior Change

Believing in Social Marketing

Social Marketing in Europe

Do We Need to Redefine Social Marketing

Miles Young on Marketing in the Modern Age

This entry was posted on Wednesday, August 17th, 2011 at 9:00 am and is filed under Behavior Change, Public Health, Social Marketing. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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